Use this easy formula as a fresh-to-dried herb converter: 1 teaspoon of dried herbs for every 1 tablespoon of fresh herbs. There isn't a difference between dried and freeze dried in terms of measurements, so you can just use two teaspoons. Toss them and purchase new jars. Double-check the markings on the handle, making sure you have the correct one. They can be used to liven up a dish with a bright, floral flavor, to add a mellow depth to broths and braising liquids, or to add a touch of color to any dish. Other exclusions include: A fresh-to-dried herb converter isn't the only thing you need to consider when making the swap. Whole Leaves per 1/2 ounce: 1/2 cup. It is quite straightforward to convert... 3. Fresh-to-Dried Herb Converter. How much fresh garlic is equal to 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder? When it says two parts for herbs, does that mean two teaspoons? If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Adjust the amount needed depending on … Chives Use this easy formula as a fresh-to-dried herb converter: 1 teaspoon of dried herbs for every 1 tablespoon of fresh herbs. 1 teaspoon. Fresh herbs can be as much as 80 percent water. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. You'll need two to three times the amount of fresh herbs to equal the dried herbs. This would be a pretty large handful of basil. Just remember to add fresh herbs toward the end of a recipe's cooking time. Whole Leaves per 1/2 ounce: 3/4 cup. Take note of which type of herb is called for in the recipe. A good rule of thumb for substituting herbs is if you're using dried herbs instead of fresh herbs, halve the measurement of the fresh herbs and use that for the measurement of dried herbs. Select the correct spoon from your set based on the recipe's instructions. Finely Minced Leaves per 1/2 ounce: 3 tablespoons. And, of course, it works the same way in reverse: 1 tablespoon of fresh basil becomes 1 teaspoon of dried. At the end of the day, herbs give you a … During the drying process, the parsley loses most of its flavor. The 3:1 ratio will work for most dried-to-fresh herb conversions; however, there are a few cases in which it's not quite so simple. Parsley; Cilantro; Dill; Tarragon; Mint; Basil; Other. Use a glass or jar with a few inches of cold water, covered with a plastic bag if you choose, and place them in the refrigerator. Weight conversions will differ from herb to herb; herbs are rarely measured by weight, however. Woody Herbs. If there's no significant aroma in the jar, it's certainly not going to add the flavor that you want during the cooking process. This article has been viewed 93,262 times. One teaspoon of dried basil becomes one tablespoon of fresh. If replacing a fresh bay leaf with dried, increase the quantity to two dried bay leaves. Keep in airtight jars or containers in a drawer or cabinet. Unfortunately, while many recipes call for fresh herbs, most pantries will not be stocked with all manner of fresh herbs at all times. A standard set of measuring spoons includes one tablespoon, one teaspoon, one 1/2 teaspoon, one 1/4 teaspoon and one 1/8 teaspoon. All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. Steps 1. First, … I only have dry basil. However, wait until the end of the recipe to include the fresh herbs, so they maintain their brightness and vibrant color. Go with whichever method feels easiest and most logical to you. You'll need at least one to one-and-a-half cups of fresh herbs in this example. If the recipe calls for fresh or dried herbs, and you... 2. Whole Leaves per 1/2 ounce: No whole leaves. To liven up your dried herbs, you can chop them with a bit of a different fresh herb (if available). A resident of Greece, Nancy Gaifyllia is a cook who writes about the country's regional specialties. If you're not sure how long a jar of herbs has been in storage, open up the jar and give it a sniff to make sure they still have potency. Sometimes, dishes benefit most from a sprinkling of fresh herbs right before serving. If the recipe calls for teaspoon amounts of dried herbs, simply convert to tablespoons of fresh herbs! Don't panic if all you have at home is the dried version: you can still create that fabulous dish with good results. Avoid using dried herbs for garnishing a dish; they do not have the same visual appeal as fresh herbs. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/00\/Measure-Fresh-vs-Dried-Herbs-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Measure-Fresh-vs-Dried-Herbs-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/00\/Measure-Fresh-vs-Dried-Herbs-Step-1.jpg\/aid1559222-v4-728px-Measure-Fresh-vs-Dried-Herbs-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":312,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"494","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}, http://ahealthykitchen.com/tips-techniques/substitution-solutions/guidelines-substitute-dried-herbs-for-fresh/, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. I have a recipe that calls for one tablespoon of fresh basil. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. % of people told us that this article helped them. Use fresh herbs when making salad dressings and salsas or if you just want a pop of color as a garnish when serving a dish. Thyme; Rosemary; Leafy Herbs. The reason for this conversion is that dried herbs have a much lower water content, and therefore have a much higher concentration of essential oils. When dried, they lose all of that water and become more potent than their fresh versions. The one exception to this rule is a bay leaf, which loses a lot of its flavor when dried. Sometimes, it's just not possible to get to the store to pick up a fresh bouquet of basil that you need for dinner. This often necessitates the substitution of dried herbs. In that case, use 1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder for every clove of fresh garlic in the recipe. However, you can purchase. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 93,262 times. Finely Minced Leaves per 1/2 ounce: 4 tablespoons. After being kept in optimal storage for a year, the herbs will begin to deteriorate. Herbs are an essential part of any cook's repertoire. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. Get daily tips and expert advice to help you take your cooking skills to the next level. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. Get a wikiHow-style meme custom made just for you! Dried herbs will lose their potency quickly if not stored properly. By using our site, you agree to our. Dried herbs and fresh herbs need to be added to recipes at different stages. 1/8 of a cup of anything is still the same amount, so it would just be 1/8 of a cup. In other words, use three times as much fresh herbs when the recipe calls for dried and 1/3 of the amount of dried herbs when the recipe calls for fresh. How much dry basil do I use? For example, if a recipe calls for fresh basil, you could instead chop some dried basil with a little bit of fresh parsley; this will add color and brightness to the herb's flavor. These oils lead to a more pronounced flavor in a smaller volume of herbs.